My Blog
By CENTER FOR COSMETIC AND SEDATION DENTISTRY
March 23, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  

If tooth loss has left you feeling less than thrilled with your smile, there is a solution for restoring it — dental implants. Whether you are missing one tooth or an entire row, dental implants could be the answer. We have restored many smiles with dental implants at the Center for Cosmetic and Sedation Dentistry in Lawrenceville, GA. Our experienced dentist, Dr. Nooredin Nurani, is a member of the American Academy of Implant Dentistry and can determine if dental implants are an option for you.

What are Dental Implants?

A dental implant is a tiny metal post that functions as a root to hold artificial teeth in place. One dental implant is used to secure a crown when replacing a single tooth. For large gaps where several teeth are missing, multiple dental implants can anchor a dental bridge or fixed denture.

Dental implants are the most secure and long-lasting tooth-replacement method today. One of the reasons they are so secure and long-lasting is that dental implants are placed directly in the jaw bone. Only a minor surgical procedure is needed to insert dental implants in the jaw. Over the next few months, the bone tissue will permanently fuse with the metal implant. This natural process is known as osseointegration.

The replacement teeth will not be attached to the dental implants until the mouth has healed from the implant procedure and osseointegration is complete, which can take from three to six months. However, temporary crowns, bridgework, or dentures can be worn in the meantime until the custom replacement teeth can be connected to the dental implants.

Unfortunately, dental implants are not an option for everyone who has experienced tooth loss. Candidates should have healthy gum tissue, as well as sufficient bone tissue in the jaw to support dental implants. Without enough bone tissue, osseointegration might not occur. The skilled dentist at our office in Lawrenceville, GA, can determine if you are a candidate for dental implants.

Benefits of Dental Implants

There are countless benefits to restoring your smile with dental implants. They are durable, secure, and long-lasting. Dental implants are also extremely versatile since they can be used with crowns, bridges, or dentures. An additional benefit is that dental implants help minimize many of the side effects of tooth loss, such as facial drooping and sagging.

Another benefit of dental implants is that they help preserve bone tissue, which is at risk of being reabsorbed by the body when there are no teeth to support it. Fortunately, the body does not attempt to reabsorb bone tissue that is supporting dental implants. Preserving bone tissue is important for several reasons. It helps maintain stable bite alignment and preserves the natural contours of your face.

Restore your smile securely and permanently with dental implants. Schedule a consultation with Dr. Nurani, the highly trained dentist at the Center for Cosmetic and Sedation Dentistry in Lawrenceville, GA, by calling (770) 995-1957. We also have offices in Buford, (770) 932-8577, and Dacula, (770) 277-0800.

By Center For Cosmetic And Sedation Dentistry
March 16, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tmj disorders  
TheCausesofChronicJawPainMightBeSimilarToFibromyalgia

Chronic joint pain (temporomandibular joint disorder or TMD) in and of itself can make life miserable. But TMD may not be the only debilitating condition you're contending with—it's quite common for TMD patients to also suffer from fibromyalgia.

Fibromyalgia is a condition with a variety of muscular and neurological symptoms like widespread pain, joint stiffness, headaches and tingling sensations. These symptoms can also give rise to sleep and mood disorder, as well as difficulties with memory. Fibromyalgia can occur in both males and females, but like TMD, it's predominant among women, particularly those in their child-bearing years.

In the past, physicians were mystified by these symptoms of body-wide pain that didn't seem to have an apparent cause such as localized nerve damage. But continuing research has produced a workable theory—that fibromyalgia is related to some defect within the brain or spinal cord (the central nervous system), perhaps even on the genetic level.

This has also led researchers to consider that a simultaneous occurrence of TMD and fibromyalgia may not be coincidental—that the same defect causing fibromyalgia may also be responsible for TMD. If this is true, then the development of new treatments based on this understanding could benefit both conditions.

For example, it's been suggested that drugs which relieve neurotransmitter imbalances in the brain may be effective in relieving fibromyalgia pain. If so, they might also have a similar effect on TMD symptoms.

As the study of conditions like fibromyalgia and TMD continues, researchers are hopeful new therapies will arise that benefit treatment for both. In the meantime, there are effective ways to cope with the symptoms of TMD, among them cold and hot therapy for inflamed jaw joints, physical exercises and stress reduction techniques.

The key is to experiment with these and other proven therapies to find the right combination for an individual patient to find noticeable relief. And perhaps one day in the not too distant future, even better treatments may arise.

If you would like more information on the connection between TMD and other chronic pain conditions, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Fibromyalgia and Temporomandibular Disorders.”

By Center For Cosmetic And Sedation Dentistry
March 06, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
TomBradyandGiseleBundchenACelebrityCouplesSecretsforaBeautifulSmile

Love at first sight—it's an endearing notion found in movies and novels, but perhaps we're a little skeptical about it happening in real life. Then again, maybe it does once in a blue moon.  According to supermodel Gisele Bündchen, something definitely happened the first time she met pro quarterback Tom Brady in 2006. And it all began when he smiled.

“The moment I saw him, he smiled and I was like, 'That is the most beautiful, charismatic smile I've ever seen!'” Bündchen said in an article for Vogue magazine. That was all it took. After a three-year romance, they married in 2009 and have been happily so ever since.

Both Brady and Bündchen have great smiles. But they also know even the most naturally attractive smile occasionally needs a little help. Here are three things our happy couple have done to keep their smiles beautiful—and you could do the same.

Teeth whitening. Bündchen is a big proponent of brightening your smile, even endorsing a line of whitening products at one point. And for good reason: This relatively inexpensive and non-invasive procedure can turn a dull, lackluster smile into a dazzling head-turner. A professional whitening can give you the safest, longest-lasting results. We can also fine-tune the whitening solution to give you just the level of brightness you want.

Teeth straightening. When Bündchen noticed one of her teeth out of normal alignment, she underwent orthodontic treatment to straighten her smile. Rather than traditional braces, she opted for clear aligners, removable trays made of translucent plastic. Effective on many types of orthodontic problems, clear aligners can straighten teeth while hardly being noticed by anyone else.

Smile repair. Brady is a frequent client of cosmetic dentistry, sometimes due to his day job. During 2015's Super Bowl XLIX against the Seattle Seahawks, Brady chipped a tooth, ironically from “head-butting” his Patriots teammate Brandon LaFell after the latter caught a touchdown pass. Fortunately, he's had this and other defects repaired—and so can you. We can restore teeth as good as new with composite resin bonding, veneers or crowns.

This superstar couple, known for their advocacy of all things healthy, would also tell you a beautiful smile is a healthy one. You can help maintain your smile's attractiveness with daily brushing and flossing to lower the risk of staining and dental disease, regular dental visits, and “tooth-friendly” eating habits.

And when your teeth need a little extra TLC, see us for a full evaluation. You may not be in the spotlight like this celebrity couple, but you can still have a beautiful smile just like theirs.

If you would like more information on ways to enhance your smile, please contact us or schedule a consultation.

By Center For Cosmetic And Sedation Dentistry
February 24, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
FlossinganImplant-SupportedBridgecanPreventaDamagingGumInfection

In recent years, dental implants have helped traditional bridgework take a giant leap forward. A few strategically placed implants can provide the highest support and stability we can currently achieve for this well-known dental restoration.

Implants derive this stability from the bone in which they're imbedded. Once surgically installed, the bone around a metal implant begins to grow and adhere to its titanium surface. Over time, this creates a strong anchor that firmly holds the implant in place.

But the implants' stability can be threatened if the gums around them become diseased. Gum disease, a bacterial infection caused mainly by dental plaque, can advance silently below the gum surface until it ultimately infects the bone. This can cause significant bone loss around an implant, which can weaken it to the point of failure.

To avoid this scenario, it's important to prevent gum disease by flossing daily to remove accumulated dental plaque between the implant-supported bridge and the gums, particularly around the implants. This kind of flossing around bridgework is more difficult than flossing between teeth, but it can be done with the help of a device called a floss threader.

A floss threader is a small plastic hand tool with a loop on one end and a stiffened edge on the other (similar to a sewing needle). You begin by threading about 18" of dental floss through the loop, and then work the other end of the threader between the bridge and gums to the other side.

With the floss threaded between the bridge and gums, you can now remove it from the threader, grasp each end, and floss around the sides of each implant you can reach. You'll then need to repeat the process by removing the floss, rethreading it in the threader and inserting it into the next section between implants, continuing to floss until you've accessed each side of each implant.

You can also use pre-packaged floss thread sections with a stiffened end to facilitate threading. But whichever product you use, it's important to perform this task each day to prevent a gum infection that could rob you of your implant-supported bridge.

If you would like more information on oral hygiene practices with dental work, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Hygiene for Fixed Bridgework.”

By Center For Cosmetic And Sedation Dentistry
February 14, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  
LoveYourHeartLoveYourGums

This month there are hearts everywhere we look, so it's fitting that February is designated as American Heart Month. We join with the American Heart Association in the goal of spreading awareness of cardiovascular disease, the top cause of death around the world. And while we think about our heart health, let's talk about the connection between cardiovascular health and oral health.

Cardiovascular disease includes heart disease, high blood pressure and cerebrovascular disease (involving the blood vessels of the brain)—in short, diseases of the circulatory system that can lead to heart attacks and strokes. Periodontal disease, in contrast, attacks the gums and other tissues that hold the teeth in place. The two conditions, however, have more in common than you might think.

Both periodontal (gum) disease and cardiovascular disease are chronic and progressive, and both are linked to inflammation. Periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease share certain inflammation markers detected in the blood that can damage blood vessels. Furthermore, specific types of oral bacteria associated with periodontal disease have been found in plaque that builds up inside of blood vessels, constricting blood flow.

People with gum disease are twice as likely to have cardiovascular disease, and studies show that having advanced gum disease worsens existing heart conditions, increases the chances of having a stroke, and raises the risk of having a first heart attack by 28%. Untreated gum disease also makes hypertension (known as “the silent killer”) worse.

However, here's some encouraging news: Intensive treatment for gum disease was shown to result in significantly lower blood pressure. So, as you think about what you can do to take care of your heart health and overall health, don't forget your gums. Here are some tips:

Maintain a dedicated oral hygiene routine. A daily oral hygiene habit that includes brushing twice a day and flossing once a day is the best thing you can do to ward off gum disease.

Visit our office for regular dental checkups. Regular dental cleanings and checkups can keep you in the best oral health. Even with daily brushing and flossing, professional cleanings are needed to remove plaque and tartar from places a toothbrush can't reach, and regular checkups allow us to detect developing problems early.

Eat for good overall health. People who consume less sugar tend to have healthier teeth and gums as well as better overall health. An “anti-inflammatory diet” that is low in sugar and other refined carbohydrates and rich in whole grains, fiber and healthy fats can reduce inflammation throughout your body—and has been shown to greatly improve gum disease.

As a former Surgeon General once wrote, “You can't have general health without oral health.” So celebrate this month of hearts by showing love to your heart and your gums.

If you have questions about how to maintain good oral health, call us or schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Good Oral Health Leads to Better Health Overall.”





This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.